China's anti-lockdown protests shake stocks and oil



*

China announces record new local COVID cases

*

Commodities caught in selling

*

Dollar extends gains against yuan

By Scott Murdoch and Lawrence White

SYDNEY/LONDON, Nov 28 (Reuters) - Stocks and commodities prices suffered a broad sell-off on Monday as rare protests in major Chinese cities against the country's strict zero-COVID curbs hit growth expectations in the world's second-largest economy.

Clashes between police and protesters across several major cities over the weekend halted a tentative stocks rally that gathered pace last week as hope-starved markets had seized any morsel of good news.

Europe's benchmark STOXX index fell 0.9% in early trading after MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan .MIAPJ0000PUS fell 1.2% on selling in Chinese markets.

Oil prices, sensitive to the strictness of China's lockdown as a barometer for demand, also slid. Brent crude LCOc1 dropped 3.1% to trade at $81.05 a barrel by 0950 GMT.

"Clearly the harsh China lockdowns have been impacting their consumer and business sentiment for some time and the persistent downgrades to China GDP have been consistent for well over a year now with further downgrades to come," George Boubouras, executive direct of K2 Asset Management in Melbourne, said.

"Markets do not like uncertainty and investors will look for some clarification to China's very harsh domestic lockdown protocols."

Fears about Chinese economic growth hit other commodities markets, with copper and other metals also falling on the protests.

Australia's benchmark stock index .AXJO closed 0.42% lower while its risk-sensitive currency AUD= was off more than 0.8%. Japan's Nikkei stock index .N225 fell 0.4%.

U.S. markets looked set to follow the bearish mood on Monday, with S&P 500 futures ESc1 0.8% lower.

CHINA COVID WORRIES DWARF CENTRAL BANK MOVES

The bigger worries about China's COVID policies dwarfed any support to investor sentiment from the central bank's 25 basis point cut to the reserve requirement ratio (RRR) announced on Friday, which would free up about $70 billion in liquidity to prop up a faltering economy.

China announced a fifth consecutive day of record new local cases with 40,052 infections on Monday.

In Shanghai, demonstrators and police clashed on Sunday night as protests over the country's stringent COVID restrictions flared for a third day.

There were also protests in Wuhan, Chengdu and parts of the capital Beijing as COVID restrictions were put in place.

Robert Subbaraman, Nomura's Asia ex-Japan chief economist, said there is a risk China's plan to live with COVID is too slow, surging COVID cases fuel more protests and social unrest further weakens the economy.

"Things are very fluid," he said. "Protests could also be the catalyst that leads to a positive outcome in leading the government to set a clearer game plan on how the country is going to learn to live with COVID."

The dollar extended gains against the yuan CNY= , rising 0.4% but off earlier session highs.

The COVID rules and resulting protests are creating fears the economic hit for China will be greater than first expected.

"Even if China is on a path to eventually move away from its zero-COVID approach, the low level of vaccination among the elderly means the exit is likely to be slow and possibly disorderly," CBA analysts said on Monday. "The economic impacts are unlikely to be small."

Yields on benchmark 10-year Treasury notes US10YT=RR reached 3.663% from its U.S. close of 3.702% on Friday. The two-year yield US2YT=RR , which tracks traders' expectations of Fed fund rates, fell to 4.448% compared with a U.S. close of 4.479%.

The dollar dropped 1% against the yen to 137.74 JPY= after initially trading higher earlier in the day. It remains well below this year's high of 151.94 on Oct. 21.

Gold prices edged up. Spot gold XAU= was traded at $1,762 per ounce.



World FX rates YTD Link
Global asset performance Link
Asian stock markets Link



Reporting by Scott Murdoch in Sydney and Lawrence White in
London; Editing by Sam Holmes and Barbara Lewis



إخلاء المسؤولية: تتيح كيانات XM Group خدمة تنفيذية فقط والدخول إلى منصة تداولنا عبر الإنترنت، مما يسمح للشخص بمشاهدة و/أو استخدام المحتوى المتاح على موقع الويب أو عن طريقه، وهذا المحتوى لا يراد به التغيير أو التوسع عن ذلك. يخضع هذا الدخول والاستخدام دائماً لما يلي: (1) الشروط والأحكام؛ (2) تحذيرات المخاطر؛ (3) إخلاء المسؤولية الكامل. لذلك يُقدم هذا المحتوى على أنه ليس أكثر من معلومات عامة. تحديداً، يرجى الانتباه إلى أن المحتوى المتاح على منصة تداولنا عبر الإنترنت ليس طلباً أو عرضاً لدخول أي معاملات في الأسواق المالية. التداول في أي سوق مالي به مخاطرة عالية برأس مالك.

جميع المواد المنشورة على منصة تداولنا مخصصة للأغراض التعليمية/المعلوماتية فقط ولا تحتوي - ولا ينبغي اعتبار أنها تحتوي - على نصائح أو توصيات مالية أو ضريبية أو تجارية، أو سجلاً لأسعار تداولنا، أو عرضاً أو طلباً لأي معاملة في أي صكوك مالية أو عروض ترويجية مالية لا داعي لها.

أي محتوى تابع للغير بالإضافة إلى المحتوى الذي أعدته XM، مثل الآراء، والأخبار، والأبحاث، والتحليلات والأسعار وغيرها من المعلومات أو روابط مواقع تابعة للغير وواردة في هذا الموقع تُقدم لك "كما هي"، كتعليق عام على السوق ولا تعتبر نصيحة استثمارية. يجب ألا يُفسر أي محتوى على أنه بحث استثماري، وأن تلاحظ وتقبل أن المحتوى غير مُعدٍ وفقاً للمتطلبات القانونية المصممة لتعزيز استقلالية البحث الاستثماري، وبالتالي، فهو بمثابة تواصل تسويقي بموجب القوانين واللوائح ذات الصلة. فضلاً تأكد من أنك قد قرأت وفهمت الإخطار بالبحوث الاستثمارية غير المستقلة والتحذير من مخاطر المعلومات السابقة، والذي يمكنك الاطلاع عليه هنا.

نحن نستخدم ملفات الكوكيز لنمنحك أفضل تجربة على موقعنا. يمكنك قراءة المزيد أو تغيير إعدادات الكوكيز.

تحذير المخاطر: رأس مالك في خطر. المنتجات التي تستخدم الرافعة قد لا تكون مناسبة للجميع. يرجى الاطلاع على تنبيه المخاطر.