Britain tells its food industry to prepare for CO2 price shock



(Corrects percentage rise to 400%, paragraph 1)

* CO2 prices will rise sharply, minister says

* UK pays fertiliser maker CF to reopen plants

* Poultry plants would have closed, Britain says

* Iceland says 3-week deal will not save Christmas

* Poultry industry says turkey production will still fall

By Guy Faulconbridge, Kate Holton and James Davey

LONDON, Sept 22 (Reuters) - Britain warned its food producers on Wednesday to prepare for a 400% rise in carbon dioxide prices after extending emergency state support to avert a shortage of poultry and meat triggered by soaring costs of wholesale natural gas.

Natural gas prices have spiked this year as economies reopened from COVID-19 lockdowns and high demand for liquefied natural gas in Asia pushed down supplies to Europe, sending shockwaves through industries reliant on the energy source.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of the fertilizer industry - Britain's main source of CO2 - where natural gas is the biggest input cost. Industrial gas companies, including Linde LING.DE , Air Liquide AIRP.PA and Air Products and Chemicals APD.N , get their CO2 mainly from fertilizer plants.

The natural gas price surge has forced some fertilizer plants to shut in recent weeks, leading to a shortage of CO2 used to put the fizz into beer and sodas and stun poultry and pigs before slaughter.

As CO2 stocks dwindled, Britain struck a deal with U.S. company CF Industries CF.N , which supplies some 60% of Britain's CO2, to restart production at two plants which were shut because they had become unprofitable due to the gas price rise.

"We need the market to adjust, the food industry knows there's going to be a sharp rise in the cost of carbon dioxide," Environment Secretary George Eustice told Sky News.

It would have to accept that the price of CO2 would rise sharply, to around 1,000 pounds ($1,365) a tonne from 200 pounds a tonne, Eustice said, adding: "So a big, sharp rise."

The three-week support for CF would cost "many millions, possibly tens of millions but it's to underpin some of those fixed costs," Eustice said.

The government gave few details about the deal to take on some of CF's fixed costs.

Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng, who also serves as energy minister, told lawmakers he was confident the country could also secure other sources of CO2.

It was not immediately clear how the state intervention by one of Europe's most traditionally laissez-faire governments would affect the price of fertilizer - another key cost for food producers - and whether or not it would stoke demands from other energy-heavy industries for similar state support.

CHRISTMAS SHORTAGES?

Ministers, including Prime Minister Boris Johnson, have repeatedly brushed aside suggestions there could be a shortages of traditional Christmas fare such as roast turkey, though some suppliers have warned of them.

Kwarteng has said there would be no return to the 1970s when Britain was plagued by power cuts that made the economy the "sick man of Europe", with three-day working weeks and people unable to heat their homes.

But the boss of supermarket Iceland said the temporary deal to supply CO2 would not solve food industry problems.

"A three week deal won’t save Christmas," said managing director Richard Walker. "And certainly won’t resolve the issue in the long term."

Eustice said some of Britain's meat and poultry processors would have run out of CO2 within days.

"We know that if we did not act, then by this weekend or certainly by the early part of next week, some of the poultry processing plants would need to close," he added.

He said the impact on food prices would be negligible.

The British Poultry Council welcomed the deal but said the industry was still facing huge pressures from labour shortages. It estimates Christmas turkey production will be down by 20% this year.

Similarly the British Meat Processors Association expressed "huge relief".

"We are focused on re-establishing (CO2) supplies before Friday this week which is when around 25% of pork production was in danger of shutting down," it said.

Britain's Food and Drink Federation said there will still be shortages of some products though they will not be as bad as previously feared, while the British Soft Drinks Association warned it would take up to two weeks before production from CF made any positive impact on market conditions.

Britain's opposition Labour party said the government needed to explain the contingency plans in place in case the C02 issues are not resolved in three weeks. ($1 = 0.7328 pounds)
Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge, Kate Holton and James Davey; additional reporting by Nigel Hunt Editing by Mark Potter, Jane Merriman and Alexander Smith

Rechtlicher Hinweis: Die Unternehmen der XM Group bieten Dienstleistungen ausschließlich zur Ausführung an sowie Zugang zu unserer Online-Handelsplattform. Durch diese können Personen die verfügbaren Inhalte auf oder über die Internetseite betrachten und/oder nutzen. Eine Änderung oder Erweiterung dieser Regelung ist nicht vorgesehen und findet nicht statt. Der Zugang wird stets geregelt durch folgende Vorschriften: (i) Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen; (ii) Risikowarnungen und (iii) Vollständiger rechtlicher Hinweis. Die bereitgestellten Inhalte sind somit lediglich als allgemeine Informationen zu verstehen. Bitte beachten Sie, dass die Inhalte auf unserer Online-Handelsplattform keine Aufforderung und kein Angebot zum Abschluss von Transaktionen auf den Finanzmärkten darstellen. Der Handel auf Finanzmärkten birgt ein hohes Risiko für Ihr eingesetztes Kapital.

Sämtliche Materialien, die auf unserer Online-Handelsplattform veröffentlicht sind, dienen ausschließlich dem Zweck der Weiterbildung und Information. Die Materialien beinhalten keine Beratung und Empfehlung im Hinblick auf Finanzen, Anlagesteuer oder Handel und sollten nicht als eine dahingehende Beratung und Empfehlung aufgefasst werden. Zudem enthalten die Materialien keine Aufzeichnungen unserer Handelspreise sowie kein Angebot und keine Aufforderung für jegliche Transaktionen mit Finanzinstrumenten oder unverlangte Werbemaßnahmen für Sie zum Thema Finanzen. Die Materialien sollten auch nicht dahingehend aufgefasst werden.

Alle Inhalte von Dritten und die von XM bereitgestellten Inhalte sowie die auf dieser Internetseite zur Verfügung gestellten Meinungen, Nachrichten, Forschungsergebnisse, Analysen, Kurse, sonstigen Informationen oder Links zu Seiten von Dritten werden ohne Gewähr bereitgestellt. Sie sind als allgemeine Kommentare zum Marktgeschehen zu verstehen und stellen keine Anlageberatung dar. Soweit ein Inhalt als Anlageforschung aufgefasst wird, müssen Sie beachten und akzeptieren, dass der Inhalt nicht in Übereinstimmung mit gesetzlichen Bestimmungen zur Förderung der Unabhängigkeit der Anlageforschung erstellt wurde. Somit ist der Inhalt als Werbemitteilung unter Beachtung der geltenden Gesetze und Vorschriften anzusehen. Bitte stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie unseren Hinweis auf die nicht unabhängige Anlageforschung und die Risikowarnung im Hinblick auf die vorstehenden Informationen gelesen und zur Kenntnis genommen haben, die Sie hier finden.

Wir verwenden Cookies, um unsere Website für Sie besonders nutzerfreundlich zu gestalten. Mehr darüber und Ihre Einstellmöglichkeiten finden Sie in den Cookie-Einstellungen.

Risikowarnung: Es bestehen Risiken für Ihr eingesetztes Kapital. Gehebelte Produkte sind nicht für alle Anleger geeignet. Bitte beachten Sie unseren Risikohinweis.