Is China headed for a Lehman-style crisis?



The Chinese economic miracle seems to have turned into a nightmare lately. With a property sector in collapse and an overleveraged banking system as global interest rates move higher at the speed of light, there is a clear risk that China might suffer a 2008 moment that infects the entire global financial system. How high is that risk and which markets would be impacted the most? 

Property boom

A seismic shift is underway in China. The past couple of decades were characterized by meteoric economic growth, which was enabled by businesses and households being encouraged to take on tons of debt. It wasn’t so much an economic miracle, but rather a mirage. 

Faced with high demand and ever-rising prices because Chinese citizens saw their houses as an investment, property developers tried to build as much as possible and banks were incentivized to lend out money to everyone. 

Over time, this process saw the real estate sector expand to account for around one third of national output, while the banking system issued out loans amounting to almost three times the size of the economy. And that’s before considering shadow banking, which is essentially off-the-books financing - something quite popular in China. 

Mortgage revolt

Worried about an asset bubble, Chinese policymakers stepped on the brakes. They issued some rules back in 2020 that forced developers to deleverage, limiting the amount of debt they can take on. A wave of defaults ensued, shattering the long-held belief that Beijing would bail out any distressed companies to prevent contagion.  

That is when the crisis entered a new phase. Around 90% of houses in China are pre-sold. Buyers are required to pay everything upfront before construction is complete - sometimes before it even starts. Worried that their developer might default and never hand over the key to their property, many people stopped paying their mortgages. It has been dubbed a ‘mortgage revolt’ and it has been spreading like wildfire. 

This is a dangerous game. When loans are not being repaid and banks have a footprint that exceeds the size of the economy many times over, it usually ends in disaster. Add in the fact that interest rates are being raised at the speed of light in other countries, making foreign investors more hesitant to seek riskier investments in China, and it looks like a ticking time bomb. 

This risk has been reflected in the nation’s junk bonds, which are trading near record lows. Investors see a lot of default risk in those bonds and want to be compensated for holding them. 

Hammer and dance 

A spiraling property crisis is not the only risk facing China. Local authorities are still pursuing a ‘hammer and dance’ strategy with covid lockdowns, enacting strict restrictions whenever outbreaks are detected in some area. The economic fallout was evident during the second quarter, when the economy contracted. 

Although the latest business surveys paint a more positive picture for this quarter, they are still consistent with an economy that is stalling and employment indicators suggest that companies are cutting workforce numbers to cope. Consumer confidence is already running at record lows. 

And the situation abroad isn’t great either. Europe has been crippled by the energy crisis and while the US economy is holding up better, it is also losing steam. That’s a threat for Chinese factory demand, which the latest data suggest is already rolling over. 

Market implications

China is the world’s second-largest economy, with deep trade ties in every country. Even though it still has soft capital controls in place, it is almost certain that any crisis would not stay contained within its borders for long. Even the Federal Reserve warned about a domino effect that could infect America in its latest Financial Stability Report. 

If the situation truly escalates, that would send shockwaves across every asset class. Stock markets could get hit hard, especially those in Asia as traders slash their risk exposure to the region. Currencies like the Australian and New Zealand dollars would likely crumble as well, since the entire business model of their economies relies on exporting commodities to China. 

The Hong Kong dollar could get ravaged too. It is already testing the weaker end of its peg with the US dollar and the local authority is burning through its FX reserves to maintain this fix. If the selling pressure becomes even greater, they might decide it is not worth defending and simply abandon it, or at least allow the currency to depreciate. 

Across the risk spectrum, the Japanese yen would likely benefit from such a scenario as traders take shelter in defensive assets and global bond yields retreat. For similar reasons, gold could come back into fashion. On the contrary, other commodities like industrial metals would probably suffer. 

Mind the bailouts

All told, this is just a toxic cocktail, with local banks being incredibly exposed to a property market that is going downhill, mortgages that aren’t being repaid, and global interest rates moving higher to amplify all the stress while the Chinese economy stalls. 

If there is a silver lining, it is that the Chinese government holds a lot of cards. It might be able to stop the contagion, at least initially, if it decides to bail out the most distressed entities before the domino effect truly begins. The People’s Bank of China is also likely to reduce interest rates further in an attempt to counter the increase in global rates. 

Only time will tell whether the policy response will be enough. For now, this seems like the most underappreciated risk surrounding the global economy - the real ‘grey swan’. 

ข่าวล่าสุด

Bitcoin erases post-FOMC drop; correlation with stocks breaks – Cryptocurrency News



Week Ahead – Euro eyes Italian elections and flash CPI, dollar may take a backseat


Technical Analysis – GER 40 index slumps to 2022 floor


Daily Market Comment – Yen skyrockets after intervention; SNB and BoE hike by less than expected

ข้อความสงวนสิทธิ์: บริษัทในเครือ XM Group มีการให้บริการดำเนินคำสั่งและการเข้าถึงแพลตฟอร์มซื้อขายออนไลน์ของเรา ซึ่งช่วยให้บุคคลสามารถดู และ/หรือใช้ข้อมูลที่มีอยู่บนหรือผ่านทางเว็บไซต์ ซึ่งไม่ได้มีการเปลี่ยนแปลงหรือขยายความจากสิ่งนี้ อีกทั้งการเข้าถึงดังกล่าวจะอยู่ภายใต้: (i) เงื่อนไขและข้อตกลง; (ii) คำเตือนเกี่ยวกับความเสี่ยง; และ (iii) ข้อความสงวนสิทธิ์ฉบับเต็ม ดังนั้นข้อมูลดังกล่าวจึงเป็นเพียงแค่ข้อมูลทั่วไปเท่านั้น นอกจากนี้โปรดทราบว่าข้อมูลต่างๆ บนแพลตฟอร์มซื้อขายออนไลน์ของเราไม่ได้มีการเชื้อเชิญหรือถือเป็นข้อเสนอให้ทำธุรกรรมใดๆ บนตลาดการเงิน และการซื้อขายบนตลาดการเงินใดๆ มีความเสี่ยงในระดับสูงกับเงินทุนของคุณ

เนื้อหาทั้งหมดที่ถูกเผยแพร่อยู่บนแพลตฟอร์มเทรดออนไลน์ของเรามีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อให้ข้อมูล/ความรู้เท่านั้นและไม่มี – และไม่ควรถือว่ามี – คำแนะนำด้านการเงิน, ภาษีการลงทุน, หรือการเทรด หรือข้อมูลราคาย้อนหลัง, หรือข้อเสนอ, หรือการเชื้อเชิญให้ทำธุรกรรมใดๆ เกี่ยวกับตราสารทางการเงินหรือโปรโมชั่นทางการเงินสำหรับท่าน

เนื้อหาของบุคคลที่สามใดๆ รวมถึงเนื้อหาที่ถูกจัดเตรียมขึ้นโดย XM เช่น ข้อคิดเห็น, ข่าวสาร, บทวิเคราะห์, ราคา, ข้อมูลอื่นๆ หรือลิงก์ไปยังเว็บไซต์ของบุคคลที่สามที่อยู่ในเว็บไซต์นี้ถูกจัดทำขึ้น “ตามที่เป็น” ซึ่งเป็นการแสดงความคิดเห็นเกี่ยวกับตลาดโดยทั่วไปและไม่ถือเป็นคำแนะนำด้านการลงทุน เนื่องจากเนื้อหาเหล่านี้ถือเป็นบทวิจัยด้านการลงทุน ท่านจะต้องทราบและยอมรับว่า เนื้อหาเหล่านี้ไม่ได้มีวัตถุประสงค์และไม่ได้มีการถูกจัดเตรียมขึ้นตามข้อกำหนดทางด้านกฎหมายที่ถูกออกแบบขึ้นมาเพื่อส่งเสริมการวิจัยด้านการลงทุนที่เป็นอิสระ ดังนั้นเนื้อหาเหล่านี้ถือเป็นการสื่อสารทางการตลาดภายใต้กฎหมายและกฎระเบียบที่เกี่ยวข้อง โปรดอ่านและทำความเข้าใจประกาศเกี่ยวกับบทวิจัยด้านการลงทุนที่ไม่ได้มีความเป็นอิสระและคำเตือนเกี่ยวกับความเสี่ยงซึ่งมีความเกี่ยวข้องกับข้อมูลต่างๆ ดังที่ได้กล่าวไปแล้ว โดยท่านสามารถดูได้ ที่นี่

เราใช้คุกกี้เพื่อให้ท่านสามารถใช้งานเว็บไซต์ของเราได้เต็มประสิทธิภาพ อ่านเพิ่มเติมหรือเปลี่ยนแปลงการตั้งค่าคุกกี้ของท่าน

คำเตือนเกี่ยวกับความเสี่ยง: เงินทุนของท่านอยู่ภายใต้ความเสี่ยง ผลิตภัณฑ์เลเวอเรจอาจไม่เหมาะสำหรับทุกท่าน โปรดอ่านและทำความเข้าใจเกี่ยวกับเอกสารข้อมูลความเสี่ยงของเรา