EU countries struggle to unify response to energy price spike



(Updates with meeting outcome)

By Kate Abnett

BRUSSELS, Dec 2 (Reuters) - France, Spain and several others stepped up calls to reform European Union's energy market rules to cope with high prices but faced a challenge from a rival group of states including Germany as energy ministers met on Thursday.

European energy prices surged to record highs this autumn amid tight supplies and high demand for gas from global economies recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. Prices have retreated from October peaks but remain elevated.

Most EU countries have already used temporary measures to shield consumers from higher bills, including energy tax cuts and subsidies for households. Together, the EU estimates those measures add up to more than 3.4 billion euros.

But EU states are split over their longer-term response.

Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands and six other states said before Thursday's meeting that they opposed EU energy market reforms. Price caps or switching to a different system to set national power prices could discourage electricity trade between countries and undermine incentives to build more low-cost renewables, they said.

Spain, France, Italy, Greece and Romania responded with a call to change EU rules to protect consumers from price swings. They also want joint gas buying by EU states to form strategic reserves and an investigation to identify reforms to the bloc's electricity market.

The European Commission said it would propose a framework to enable joint procurement of strategic gas stocks, as part of a proposal to upgrade EU gas market legislation, due on Dec. 14.

Energy commissioner Kadri Simson said improvements also were needed in power interconnectors and the flexibility of Europe's electricity grids. "Work on all these issues is ongoing," she said.

A report last month by EU energy regulators did not identify major issues with the bloc's power market design. An investigation by the EU securities watchdog said there was no proof of market abuse in the EU carbon market.

The findings were criticised on Thursday by some countries which want curbs on financial speculation in the carbon market, which they say have helped push CO2 permit prices to record highs.

"We can no longer pretend that the ETS (Emissions Trading System) is a perfectly functioning system ... it requires a deep reform," Polish climate minister Anna Moskwa said.
Reporting by Kate Abnett, additional reporting by Isla Binnie; editing by David Evans and Emelia Sithole-Matarise

免責聲明: XM Group提供線上交易平台的登入和執行服務,允許個人查看和/或使用網站所提供的內容,但不進行任何更改或擴展其服務和訪問權限,並受以下條款與條例約束:(i)條款與條例;(ii)風險提示;(iii)完全免責聲明。網站內部所提供的所有資訊,僅限於一般資訊用途。請注意,我們所有的線上交易平台內容並不構成,也不被視為進入金融市場交易的邀約或邀請 。金融市場交易會對您的投資帶來重大風險。

所有缐上交易平台所發佈的資料,僅適用於教育/資訊類用途,不包含也不應被視爲適用於金融、投資稅或交易相關諮詢和建議,或是交易價格紀錄,或是任何金融商品或非應邀途徑的金融相關優惠的交易邀約或邀請。

本網站的所有XM和第三方所提供的内容,包括意見、新聞、研究、分析、價格其他資訊和第三方網站鏈接,皆爲‘按原狀’,並作爲一般市場評論所提供,而非投資建議。請理解和接受,所有被歸類為投資研究範圍的相關内容,並非爲了促進投資研究獨立性,而根據法律要求所編寫,而是被視爲符合營銷傳播相關法律與法規所編寫的内容。請確保您已詳讀並完全理解我們的非獨立投資研究提示和風險提示資訊,相關詳情請點擊 這裡查看。

我們運用 cookies 提供您最佳之網頁使用經驗。更改您的cookie 設定跟詳情。

風險提示: 您的資金存在風險。杠杆商品可能不適合所有客戶。 請詳細閱讀我們的風險聲明