XM ไม่ได้ให้บริการแก่ผู้ที่พำนักอยู่ในสหรัฐอเมริกา

Column: Block.one investors try, try again for final OK on $22 million class settlement



<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><head><title>Column: Block.one investors try, try again for final OK on $22 million class settlement</title></head><body>

The opinions expressed here are those of the author, a columnist for Reuters.

By Alison Frankel

May 29 (Reuters) -How do you catch the attention of a busy federal judge who has seemingly lost interest in your proposed class action settlement?

That’s the conundrum facing Grant & Eisenhofer, which represents a class of investors who contend they were misled about crypto tokens issued by blockchain company Block.one back in 2017.

Last May, after three years of litigation and the rejection of an initial $27 million settlement proposal, plaintiffs lawyers finally persuaded U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan of Manhattan to grant preliminary approval of a revised $22 million deal for investors who bought tokens in U.S. transactions. (Block.one agreed to the settlement but continued to deny wrongdoing.) As I told you at the time, the revised settlement seemed to be a rare win for investors alleging fraud claims against a token issuer.

If only things were that easy.

In July 2023, after notices went out to hundreds of thousands of potential class members, Grant & Eisenhofer moved for final approval of the deal, as well as $5.5 million in attorneys fees.

Kaplan scheduled a final approval hearing for September 2023 — but abruptly canceled it without explanation on the day it was supposed to take place.

Two months later — in between overseeing the prosecution of former FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried and the second civil trial of writer E. Jean Carroll’s defamation claims against former U.S. President Donald Trump — Kaplan issued an order directing Grant & Eisenhofer and Block.one’s lawyers from Davis Polk & Wardwell to submit a spreadsheet detailing the alleged losses of each of the 277 investors who had submitted a claim to administrators of the $22 million settlement fund.

Davis Polk and Grant & Eisenhofer emailed a joint letter to Kaplan’s chambers on Nov. 22, attaching a spreadsheet with the information the judge had requested.

Claimants’ losses, they explained, totaled about $8.5 million, far less than the $16 million that would remain in the settlement fund after the subtraction of legal fees and expenses. But class members were entitled to another $6 million or so in interest, Grant & Eisenhofer said. That would leave about $2 million in the settlement fund. Plaintiffs' lawyers proposed distributing the leftover money on a pro rata basis to class members who had submitted valid claims.

Kaplan apparently did not receive the letter.

In a terse one-page order in February, the judge denied Grant & Eisenhofer’s motion for final approval of the settlement. Kaplan said he’d ordered the parties to provide him with additional information about claimants’ losses and they hadn’t supplied that information.

Grant & Eisenhofer lawyers rushed to reassure Kaplan that they had, in fact, sent him the data soon after he asked for it. The lawyers offered apologies if their letter had somehow not reached the judge back in November — but also asked him to reconsider his rejection of the deal. For good measure, they attached the spreadsheets they’d first emailed to Kaplan’s chambers in November.

Kaplan did not respond, according to the docket.

A couple of days later, Grant & Eisenhofer sent the judge another letter with updated information on the claims process. The number of claims, the firm said, was up to 296, with alleged losses totaling $9.6 million.

Kaplan did not respond, according to the docket.

In March, Grant & Eisenhofer formally moved for reconsideration, pointing out that Kaplan’s sole reason for denying final approval was the parties’ purported failure to respond to his demand for detailed information about class members’ claims. In reality, the motion said, the judge had “overlooked” the letter providing exactly the information he sought.

Kaplan, once again, did not respond.

So last week, Grant & Eisenhofer filed a renewed motion for final approval of the settlement and the firm's request for attorneys’ fees, reminding Kaplan of the backstory behind his order denying the previous motion. In essence, the filing said that the claims process is complete and $22 million (plus interest) is sitting in a bank account awaiting Kaplan’s green light for distribution to investors.

As of midafternoon on Wednesday, the judge had not docketed any acknowledgement of the latest motion.

I emailed lawyers from Grant & Eisenhofer and Davis Polk about the stalled settlement but didn’t hear back. Block.one also did not respond to my query.

A $22 million securities settlement certainly isn’t the highest-profile matter on Kaplan’s docket. On Tuesday, for instance, the judge sentenced former FTX executive Ryan Salame to 90 months in prison for his role in an illegal campaign donation scheme.

It’s also true that only a relative handful of Block.one token purchasers filed claims to recover the money they lost when they bought crypto tokens issued by the company.

Nevertheless, a couple hundred class members stand to get back everything they lost, plus interest. The settlement received preliminary approval a year ago and the claims process is complete.

Kaplan's final assessment of the deal is the only thing standing between those investors and a $22 million payout — or, if the judge rejects the final settlement, between Block.one and the return of a $2 million settlement fund.

At the very least, both sides deserve to know whether the judge intends to issue a ruling on the merits of the deal.


Read more:

Block.one’s revived $22 mln settlement could be template for crypto class actions

Crypto investors' class settlement with Block.one killed by N.Y. judge




</body></html>

ข่าวล่าสุด

Flooding hits China's south, temperatures sizzle elsewhere


Adidas investigates bribery allegations in China, FT reports

A

Serbia to green light Rio Tinto lithium mine, FT reports

R

Iran rebukes G7 statement over its nuclear programme escalation


Adidas Investigates Bribery Allegations In China- FT

A

ข้อความสงวนสิทธิ์: บริษัทในเครือ XM Group มีการให้บริการดำเนินคำสั่งและการเข้าถึงแพลตฟอร์มซื้อขายออนไลน์ของเรา ซึ่งช่วยให้บุคคลสามารถดู และ/หรือใช้ข้อมูลที่มีอยู่บนหรือผ่านทางเว็บไซต์ ซึ่งไม่ได้มีการเปลี่ยนแปลงหรือขยายความจากสิ่งนี้ อีกทั้งการเข้าถึงดังกล่าวจะอยู่ภายใต้: (i) เงื่อนไขและข้อตกลง; (ii) คำเตือนเกี่ยวกับความเสี่ยง; และ (iii) ข้อความสงวนสิทธิ์ฉบับเต็ม ดังนั้นข้อมูลดังกล่าวจึงเป็นเพียงแค่ข้อมูลทั่วไปเท่านั้น นอกจากนี้โปรดทราบว่าข้อมูลต่างๆ บนแพลตฟอร์มซื้อขายออนไลน์ของเราไม่ได้มีการเชื้อเชิญหรือถือเป็นข้อเสนอให้ทำธุรกรรมใดๆ บนตลาดการเงิน และการซื้อขายบนตลาดการเงินใดๆ มีความเสี่ยงในระดับสูงกับเงินทุนของคุณ

เนื้อหาทั้งหมดที่ถูกเผยแพร่อยู่บนแพลตฟอร์มเทรดออนไลน์ของเรามีวัตถุประสงค์เพื่อให้ข้อมูล/ความรู้เท่านั้นและไม่มี – และไม่ควรถือว่ามี – คำแนะนำด้านการเงิน, ภาษีการลงทุน, หรือการเทรด หรือข้อมูลราคาย้อนหลัง, หรือข้อเสนอ, หรือการเชื้อเชิญให้ทำธุรกรรมใดๆ เกี่ยวกับตราสารทางการเงินหรือโปรโมชั่นทางการเงินสำหรับท่าน

เนื้อหาของบุคคลที่สามใดๆ รวมถึงเนื้อหาที่ถูกจัดเตรียมขึ้นโดย XM เช่น ข้อคิดเห็น, ข่าวสาร, บทวิเคราะห์, ราคา, ข้อมูลอื่นๆ หรือลิงก์ไปยังเว็บไซต์ของบุคคลที่สามที่อยู่ในเว็บไซต์นี้ถูกจัดทำขึ้น “ตามที่เป็น” ซึ่งเป็นการแสดงความคิดเห็นเกี่ยวกับตลาดโดยทั่วไปและไม่ถือเป็นคำแนะนำด้านการลงทุน เนื่องจากเนื้อหาเหล่านี้ถือเป็นบทวิจัยด้านการลงทุน ท่านจะต้องทราบและยอมรับว่า เนื้อหาเหล่านี้ไม่ได้มีวัตถุประสงค์และไม่ได้มีการถูกจัดเตรียมขึ้นตามข้อกำหนดทางด้านกฎหมายที่ถูกออกแบบขึ้นมาเพื่อส่งเสริมการวิจัยด้านการลงทุนที่เป็นอิสระ ดังนั้นเนื้อหาเหล่านี้ถือเป็นการสื่อสารทางการตลาดภายใต้กฎหมายและกฎระเบียบที่เกี่ยวข้อง โปรดอ่านและทำความเข้าใจประกาศเกี่ยวกับบทวิจัยด้านการลงทุนที่ไม่ได้มีความเป็นอิสระและคำเตือนเกี่ยวกับความเสี่ยงซึ่งมีความเกี่ยวข้องกับข้อมูลต่างๆ ดังที่ได้กล่าวไปแล้ว โดยท่านสามารถดูได้ ที่นี่

คำเตือนความเสี่ยง: เงินทุนของท่านมีความเสี่ยง ผลิตภัณฑ์ที่มีอัตราทดอาจไม่เหมาะสำหรับนักลงทุนบางราย โปรดศึกษาและทำความเข้าใจเอกสารเปิดเผยข้อมูลความเสี่ยงของเรา